Blue oak woodland in Hammon Grove Park. Some of the native shrub understory survives, but the native herbaceous plants have been largely replaced by non-native annual invasive weeds, which are the reason California's characteristic "golden hills" are their well-known shade of golden brown for so much of the year. Photo by queerbychoice. Central oak woodland is the plant community native to most of Sutter and Yuba Counties. Specifically, it covers all land below approximately 1,600 feet in Yuba County (above that is yellow pine forest), and all land above approximately 50 feet in Sutter County (below that is valley grassland)1—and except for wetlands in both counties (which are part of the riparian forest or in some cases, freshwater marsh). It is defined by a predominance of oak trees.

A synonym for central oak woodland is "foothill woodland," although this name is somewhat misleading. The plant community in question does cover much of the foothills, but it also covers covers much of California's central valley—or it once did, before cities were built in the valley and many of the native plants were removed. Alemandra, Arboga, Beale Air Force Base, Berg, Bogue, Browns Valley, Dantoni, Daugherty Hill State Wildlife Area, District 10, East Arboga, Encinal, Frenchtown, Hallwood, Hammonton, Horstville, Iowa City, Linda, Live Oak, Loma Rica, Marigold, Marysville, Mello, Mount Vernon, Olive Hill, Olivehurst, Oregon House, Ostrom, Pearson, Pennington, Rackerby, Ramirez, Rancho Loma Rica, Sanders, Sicard Flat, Smartsville, South Yuba, South Yuba City, Spenceville State Wildlife Area, Stanfield Hill, Sullivan, Sunset, Sutter, the Sutter Buttes, Tambo, Tierra Buena, West Butte, West Linda, Wheatland, and Yuba City are all in central oak woodland.

Central oak woodland manifests itself somewhat differently at different elevations and with differing groundwater supplies. In general, groundwater supplies tend to be more ample at lower elevations. In the Sacramento Valley, the oak trees are often primarily valley oaks, which are the least drought-tolerant of the native oak trees. Areas where valley oaks predominate are sometimes called valley oak woodland. Valley oaks, blue oaks, interior live oaks, Frémont's cottonwoods, blue elderberries, toyon, California coffeeberries, California wild grapes, Pacific blackberries, and poison oak are all very common in valley oak woodland. The Frémont's cottonwoods, blue elderberries, California wild grapes, and Pacific blackberries are found in the spots with the most ample supply of groundwater, while the blue oaks, interior live oaks, toyon, and California coffeeberries are found in slightly drier spots.2 (Unfortunately, poison oak grows throughout all central oak woodland areas and all of Yuba and Sutter Counties, regardless of water supply. Sorry!) The soil in valley oak woodland is typically clay, with high fertility but poor drainage.

In the foothills or where the groundwater supply is especially sparse, the oak trees are primarily blue oaks, because these are the most drought-tolerant of the native oak trees. Areas where blue oaks predominate are sometimes called blue oak woodland. Blue oaks, gray pines, interior live oaks, California buckeyes, Western redbuds, blue elderberries, common manzanitas, buckbrush, yerba santa, silver bush lupine, California coffeeberries, redberries, rock gooseberries, and poison oak are all very common in blue oak woodland. Blue oak woodland occurs across a range of elevations in the foothills, but gray pines, interior live oaks, yerba santa, and rock gooseberries are found in greater numbers at the higher elevations within the blue oak woodland's range.3 The soil in blue oak woodland may be red clay or sandy loam. Because the ground is often sloped in the foothills, the drainage is typically better in blue oak woodland than in valley oak woodland.

Wherever the groundwater supply is exactly right for the species of oak growing there, the oak trees may grow so closely that most of them touch each other, and there may be a significant number of shrubs growing beneath them; this is sometimes referred to as oak forest. Where the groundwater supply is less appropriate for the species of oak growing there, the oak trees will be widely spaced, with very few or no shrubs growing beneath them; this is sometimes referred to as oak savannah.

Throughout California, much of the native understory in central oak woodland areas has been largely replaced by invasive weeds—primarily annual grasses. These non-native annual grasses are the reason California's characteristic "golden hills" are their well-known shade of golden brown for so much of the year. Before the arrival of Europeans, the ground beneath the oaks contained far fewer annual grasses and was instead dominated by the wildflowers listed below, supplemented occasionally with the grasses listed below—many of which do not die or turn brown in late summer, but instead turn a dull blue-green to conserve water until the winter rains arrive.

Oak tree seedlings rarely sprout or survive in the presence of non-native weeds. As a result of the non-native annual grasses having replaced so much of their understory, the oak trees in central oak woodland areas throughout California are no longer replacing themselves as quickly as they die off. If nothing is done to help them, central oak woodland will largely disappear within the next century. The ecosystem's health, stability, and beauty can be greatly improved by removing the invasive grasses and planting native plants. The plants listed below are native to central oak woodland in Yuba and/or Sutter Counties.4

Trees

Oaks

Canyon live oak (Quercus chrysolepis). Photo by queerbychoice. (See the Oaks page for more information about these and other oak species.)

Caliornia scrub oak*

canyon live oak* (also called gold cup oak or maul oak)

blue oak

valley oak (also called California white oak)

interior live oak

*not typically found in valley oak woodland

The small, shallowly lobed leaves of blue oak (Quercus douglasii) in Hammon Grove Park. Photo by queerbychoice. Valley oak (Quercus lobata) in Beckwourth Riverfront Park Complex. Photo by queerbychoice. The holly-like leaves of interior live oak (Quercus wislizeni) in Hammon Grove Park. Photo by queerbychoice.

Other Trees

Bigleaf maple (Acer macrophyllum) on the Feather River Little North Fork, north of Strawberry Valley. Photo by queerbychoice. (See the Conifers and Native Edible Fruits pages for more information about some of these species.)

bigleaf maple

California buckeye (also called California horse chestnut)

Pacific madrone*

sticky whiteleaf manzanita*

Western redbud*

flowering ash* (also called foothill ash or two-petal ash)

gray pine* (also called foothill pine or bull pine)

Frémont's cottonwood

Western chokecherry

Western hop tree

blue elderberry

California bay laurel

*not typically found in valley oak woodland

Pacific madrone (Arbutus menziesii) in the California State University Sacramento arboretum. Photo by queerbychoice. In February, pink buds cover the bare trunk of a Western redbud (Cercis occidentalis) in a garden in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice. Gray pines (Pinus sabiniana) in Hammon Grove Park display characteristically rounded tops, with mostly bare trunks below. Photo by queerbychoice. Frémont's cottonwood (Populus fremontii) in the American River Parkway, with cotton-like seeds. The tree is named for John C. Frémont. Photo by queerbychoice. Blue elderberry (Sambucus mexicana) in Beckwourth Riverfront Park Complex. The unripe berries have a white coating; the coating slowly wears away as the berries ripen. Photo by queerbychoice. California bay laurel (Umbellularia californica). Photo by queerbychoice.

Shrubs

Common manzanita (Arctostaphylos manzanita) in Auburn State Recreation Area, with paintbrushes beneath it. Photo by queerbychoice. (See the California Lilacs, Buckwheats, Beardtongues, Lupines, Buckthorns, Native Edible Fruits, and Roses pages for more information about some of these species.)

common manzanita

coyote brush*

shining netvein barberry

spicebush (also called sweet shrub)

buckbrush* (also called wedgeleaf California lilac)

Lemmon's California lilac*

California hazelnut

goldenfleece*

yerba santa* (also called mountain balm)

naked buckwheat

stretchberry (also called desert olive or spring goldenglow)

California coffeeberry

toyon

gaping beardtongue

California juniper*

white pitcher sage* (also called woodbalm)

silver bush lupine (also called evergreen purple lupine)

Frémont's bush mallow*

Lewis' mock orange

redberry

fragrant sumac

rock gooseberry** (also called oak gooseberry)

California wild rose

dwarf rose* (also called wood rose)

Parish's purple nightshade*

California snowdrop bush

upright snowberry*

*not typically found in valley oak woodland

**not typically found east of the Sutter Buttes

Coyote brush (Baccharis pilularis) shrubs are plentiful on the other sides of all the levees surrounding Marysville. In winter, the female coyote brushes are easy to spot by the way they cover the ground with a snow-like layer of fluffy, white seeds. Photo by queerbychoice. Several buckbrush (Ceanothus cuneatus) shrubs bloom with white flowers under oak and pine trees near Smartsville. Photo by queerbychoice. Lemmon's California lilac (Ceanothus lemmonii) blooming with blue flowers, accompanied by red paintbrushes and a young yellow pine tree. Photo by queerbychoice. California hazelnut (Corylus cornuta) near Strawberry Valley. Photo by queerbychoice. Naked buckwheat (Eriogonum nudum) is named for the fact that it has no leaves except for a few small ones at ground level. Photo by queerbychoice. A California coffeeberry (Frangula californica) in the American River Parkway, laden with fruit. Photo by queerbychoice. Toyon (Heteromeles arbutifolia) in the California State University Sacramento arboretum. The clusters of berries will turn bright red as they ripen. Photo by queerbychoice. Silver bush lupine (Lupinus albifrons) in a garden in Marysville, with California golden poppies. Photo by queerbychoice. Frémont's bush mallow (Malacothamnus fremontii) blooms with pale pink flowers in a garden in Marysville. The shrub is named for John C. Frémont. Photo by queerbychoice. A single flower blooms on a ground-level branch of a young mock orange (Philadelphus lewisii) in a Marysville garden. Photo by queerbychoice. California wild rose (Rosa californica) under the 5th Street Bridge, with hips and one remaining flower in October. Photo by queerbychoice. Dwarf wood rose (Rosa gymnocarpa) near Quincy. Photo by queerbychoice.

Vines

California manroot (Marah fabaceus) in the American River Parkway. Photo by queerbychoice. (See the Native Edible Fruits page for more information about some of these species.)

California Dutchman's pipe

Western morning glory*

virgin's bower (also called Western creek clematis or yerba de chiva)

pink honeysuckle (also called California honeysuckle or hairy honeysuckle)

chaparral honeysuckle*

California manroot (also called wild cucumber)

Pacific blackberry (also called trailing blackberry)

poison oak

California wild grape

*not typically found in valley oak woodland

The berries of pink honeysuckle (Lonicera hispidula), shown here on the Feather Falls trail, are edible but have a very bitter aftertaste. Photo by queerbychoice. California wild grape (Vitis californica) in the small state wildlife area next to the Marysville City Cemetery. Photo by queerbychoice.

Herbaceous Perennials

Monocots

Grasses and Grasslike Plants

True Grasses

California oniongrass (Melica californica) in a garden in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice. (See the Ryegrasses and Oniongrasses pages for more information about some of these species.)

California brome

squirreltail ryegrass* (also called bottlebrush rye grass)

blue wild ryegrass

big squirreltail ryegrass

coast fescue**

prairie junegrass*

creeping wild rye (also called valley wild rye, alkali rye, or beardless wild rye)

California oniongrass

smallflower oniongrass** (also called coast range melic)

Torrey's oniongrass

deergrass

nodding needlegrass (also called nodding tussockgrass or nodding stipa)

purple needlegrass (also called purple tussockgrass or purple stipa)

Pacific panicgrass

pine bluegrass (also called one-sided bluegrass)

*not typically found in valley oak woodland **not typically found in blue oak woodland

Deergrass (Muhlenbergia rigens) in the California State University Sacramento arboretum. Photo by queerbychoice.

Sedges

Valley sedge (Carex barbarae) in a garden in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice. (See the Sedges page for more information about these and other sedge species.)

widefruit sedge* (also called narrowleaf sedge)

valley sedge (also called Santa Barbara sedge)

slender sedge*

torrent sedge (also called naked sedge)

*not typically found in valley oak woodland

Rushes

Wire rush (Juncus balticus) next to an outdoor faucet in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice. (See the Rushes page for more information about these and other rush species.)

wire rush (also called Baltic rush)

common bog rush (also called soft rush)

Mexican rush*

poverty rush (also called slender rush)

Pacific hairy woodrush*

*not typically found in valley oak woodland

Bulbs and Corms

Asparagus Family

Golden prettyface (Triteleia ixioides) blooms in a garden in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice. (See the Cluster-Lilies page for more information about these species.)

appendage cluster-lily

California cluster-lily*

crown cluster-lily (also called early harvest cluster-lily)

harvest cluster-lily* (also called elegant cluster-lily)

dwarf cluster-lily* (also called vernal pool cluster-lily)

Sierra cluster-lily*

forktooth ookow*

wild hyacinth (also called roundtooth ookow or many-flowered snakelily)

Bridges' prettyface

golden prettyface*

Ithuriel's spear

*not typically found in valley oak woodland

Ithuriel's spear (Triteleia laxa) is found in both Yuba and Sutter Counties. Photo by queerbychoice.

Lily Family

Superb mariposa tulip (Calochortus superbus) in a garden in Marysville, with California golden poppies. Photo by queerbychoice. (See the Tulips and Fritillaries pages for more information about some of these species.)

fairy lantern (also called white globe lily)

clubhair mariposa tulip

yellow mariposa tulip

yellow star tulip*

superb mariposa tulip

Sierra fawn lily* (also called adder's-tongue)

mission bells (also called checker lily)

chocolate lily

Butte County fritillary*

scarlet fritillary*

*not typically found in valley oak woodland

 
Other Bulbs and Corms

Narrowleaf onion (Allium amplectens) blooms on Table Mountain. Photo by queerbychoice. (See the Onions page for more information about some of these species.)

narrowleaf onion

Sanborn's onion*

narrowleaf soaproot

wavyleaf soaproot (also called amole)

bowltube iris (also called longtube iris or ground iris)

slender iris (also called longtube iris)

Hartweg's doll's lily

Michael's rein orchid*

royal rein orchid (also called mountain rein orchid)

Western blue-eyed grass

meadow death camas (also called meadow zigadene)

*not typically found in valley oak woodland

Hartweg's doll's lily (Odontostomum hartwegii) blooms in a garden in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice. Blue-eyed grass (Sisyrinchium bellum) in a garden in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice.

Dicots

Aster Family

Mugwort (Artemisia douglasiana) in a garden in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice. (See the Daisies and Mule Ears pages for more information about some of these species.)

mugwort

California balsamroot (also called big scale balsam root)

California brickellbush

woolly sunflower (also called Oregon sunshine)

roughleaf aster*

serpentine sunflower

telegraph weed

whitecrown

California goldenrod

California aster

narrowleaf mule ears (also called California compassplant)

whitehead mule ears** (also called gray mule ears)

El Dorado mule ears*

*not typically found in valley oak woodland **not typically found in blue oak woodland

The yellow flowers and pinkish grey buds of woolly sunflower (Eriophyllum lanatum) mingle with tidytips, common goldfields, bird's eye gilyflower, and scarlet mallow in a Marysville garden. Photo by queerbychoice. Serpentine sunflower (Helianthus bolanderi) blooms with the smaller flowers of rosillas (Helenium puberulum) in a Marysville garden. Photo by queerbychoice. Telegraph weed (Heterotheca grandiflora) volunteers in a garden in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice. California goldenrod (Solidago californica) blooming in a Marysville garden. Photo by queerbychoice. California aster (Symphyotrichum chilense) in a garden in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice.

Buttercup Family

A California buttercup (Ranunculus californicus) blooming in a Marysville garden. Photo by queerbychoice. (See the Larkspurs and Buttercups pages for more information about these and other larkspur and buttercup species.)

pine forest larkspur* (also called meadow larkspur)

El Dorado larkspur*

Western larkspur

red larkspur* (also called canyon larkspur)

spreading larkspur* (also called zigzag larkspur)

California buttercup

Sacramento Valley buttercup

*not typically found in valley oak woodland

 

Other Plant Families

Fringed Northern willowherb (Epilobium ciliatum) volunteers in a garden in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice. (See the Milkweeds, Paintbrushes, Willowherbs, Woodland Stars, Deervetches, Lupines, Coyote Mints, Beardtongues, Skullcaps, and Violets pages for more information about some of these species.)

Brewer's rockcress*

heartleaf milkweed* (also called purple milkweed)

kotolo milkweed* (also called Indian milkweed or woollypod milkweed)

narrowleaf milkweed* (also called Mexican whorled milkweed)

Franciscan paintbrush (also called longleaf paintbrush)

California goosefoot

padre's shooting star

broadleaf shooting star (also called mosquito bills)

fringed Northern willowherb (also called slender willowherb)

Western wallflower (also called sand-dune wallflower or prairie rocket)

California golden poppy

snub pea*

bitterroot*

blue toadflax**

blue flax*

Sierra woodland star

hillside woodland star** (also called hill star)

prairie woodland star

woollyfruit lace parsnip

chaparral bird's foot trefoil* (also called bigleaf deervetch)

miniature lupine

giant blazing star

coyote mint

Indian warrior*

azure beardtongue*

foothill beardtongue* (also called bunchleaf beardtongue)

gay beardtongue* (also called mountain blue beardtongue)

rock phacelia* (also called Kaweah River phacelia)

imbricate phacelia*

Sierra mint* (also called California mountain mint)

California saxifrage

grayleaf skullcap* (also called curve-flowered skullcap)

common skullcap*

checker mallow (also called wild hollyhock or dwarf checkerbloom)

whitestem green gentian*

Western vervain

Douglas' golden violet*

*not typically found in valley oak woodland

**not typically found east of the Sutter Buttes

The fluorescent orange of sand-dune wallflower (Erysimum capitatum) mingles with blue flax and arroyo lupine in a garden in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice. A single bitterroot (Lewisia rediviva) flower blooms among much smaller Pacific stonecrop flowers on Table Mountain. Photo by queerbychoice. Blue flax (Linum lewisii) shows off its fine foliage and blue flowers against the broad leaves of chrysanthemums in a garden in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice. California golden poppies (Eschscholzia californica) growing wild on the Marysville levee. Photo by queerbychoice. Woollyfruit lace parsnip (Lomatium dasycarpum) and a California golden poppy seedling in a garden in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice. Checker mallow (Sidalcea malviflora) in a garden in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice.

Ferns

Field horsetail rush (Equisetum arvense) near Strawberry Valley. Photo by queerbychoice. (See the Maidenhair Ferns, Horsetails, and Wood Ferns pages for more information about these and other fern and horsetail species.)

California maidenhair fern

California lacefern

brittle bladderfern* (also called fragile fern)

field horsetail rush

coffee fern* (also called coffee cliffbrake)

bird's foot fern (also called bird's foot cliffbrake)

goldenback fern

California polypody

Western brackenfern

Hansen's spikemoss*

*not typically found in valley oak woodland

Goldenback fern (Pentagramma triangularis) prefers full shade, as most ferns do. Photo by queerbychoice. California polypody (Polypodium californicum) in a Marysville garden, with California poppy seedlings in the background. Photo by queerbychoice.

Annuals

Monocots

Grasses

prairie threeawn (also called oldfield three awn)

California bromegrass

Scribner's grass

Pacific fescue

Dicots

Aster Family

Hayfield tarweed (Hemizonia congesta) and California fuchsia in a garden in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice. (See the Goldfields, Tarweeds, and Tidytips pages for more information about some of these species.)

mountain dandelion

Klamath Western rosinweed

sticky Western rosinweed

spiked Western rosinweed

truncated Western rosinweed

hayfield tarweed

Fitch's spikeweed (also called Fitch's tarweed)

pitgland tarweed (also called narrow yellowflower tarweed)

Ramm's tarweed

glandular hareleaf

common branched hareleaf

California goldfields (also called common goldfields or valley goldfields)

smallray goldfields

smooth tidytips

Fremont's tidytips

coastal tidytips

Colusa tidytips

dwarf lessingia

threadstem lessingia

plumpseed tarweed

gumweed tarweed (also called slender grassy tarweed)

slender tarweed

woolly desertdandelion

slender cottontop (also called Q-tips)

Hartweg's golden sunburst

wireweed

Santa Barbara wirelettuce

tall rod wirelettuce (also called twiggy wreath plant)

silverpuffs

California goldfields (Lasthenia californica) mix with clustered field sedge in a garden in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice. Common tidytips (Layia platyglossa) in a garden in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice.

Borage Family

Smallflower fiddleneck (Amsinckia menziesii) and unidentified popcornflowers on Table Mountain. Photo by queerbychoice. (See the Phacelias page for more information about some of these species.)

Douglas' fiddleneck

tarweed fiddleneck

common orange fiddleneck

weakstem cryptanth

common Clearwater cryptanth

beaked cryptanth

small baby blue eyes (also called white canyon nemophila)

fivespot

baby blue eyes

sleeping combseed (also called winged combseed)

caterpillar phacelia

Great Valley phacelia

common distant phacelia (also called wild heliotrope)

Douglas' phacelia

tansyleaf phacelia (also called lacy phacelia)

valley popcornflower

common popcornflower

sleeping popcornflower

Five spot (Nemophila maculata) blooms in a garden in Marysville, along with non-native scarlet mallow. Photo by queerbychoice. Baby blue eyes (Nemophila menziesii) bloom in a garden in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice.

Mustard Family

common dwarf sandweed

shaggy California mustard

sand fringepod (also called hairy lacepod)

ribbed fringepod (also called showy fringepod)

slender keelfruit

 

Pea Family

The pale yellow flower spikes of chick lupine (Lupinus microcarpus) mix with purple Chinese pagodas, bird's eye gilyflowers, yellowray goldfields, tidytips, woolly sunflower, and non-native scarlet mallow in a garden in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice. (See the Deervetches, Lupines, and Clovers pages for more information about some of these species.)

dwarf milkvetch (also called dwarf locoweed)

depauperate milkvetch

foothill deervetch (also called shortpod lotus or colchita)

desert deervetch (also called smallflower trefoil or San Diego lotus)

Spanish clover

hairy bird's foot trefoil

American bird's foot trefoil

Chilean bird's foot trefoil (also called calf lotus)

spider lupine

chick lupine (also called valley lupine)

sky lupine

fatpod lupine (also called Mt. Diablo lupine or bigpod lupine)

harlequin lupine

arroyo lupine (also called hollowstem lupine or succulent lupine)

Indian rancheria clover

sour clover (also called bull clover)

pinpoint clover (also called graceful clover)

hairy maiden clover (also called smallhead field clover)

tomcat clover

Sky lupine (Lupinus nanus) on Table Mountain. Photo by queerbychoice. Arroyo lupine (Lupinus succulentus) on a levee in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice. Sour clover (Trifolium fucatum) blooms in a garden in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice. Tomcat clover (Trifolium willdenovii) in flower and bud on Table Mountain. Photo by queerbychoice.

Mint Family

(See the Coyote Mints page for more information about some of these species.)

Douglas' monardella

mustang mint

Sacramento mesamint

chia sage

vinegarweed

 

Evening-Primrose Family

Mountain garland (Clarkia unguiculata) explodes in shades of pink, reddish purple, and white in early May in a garden in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice. (See the Clarkias and Willowherbs pages for more information about some of these species.)

hill suncup

twolobe clarkia

slender godetia (also called graceful farewell-to-spring)

Mosquin's clarkia

winecup godetia (also called purple farewell-to-spring)

diamondpetal farewell-to-spring (also called forest farewell-to-spring)

mountain garland (also called elegant farewell-to-spring or woodland clarkia)

Sierra clarkia

tall autumn willowherb (also called panicled willowherb)

denseflower willowherb (also called denseflower spike-primrose)

slender annual fireweed (also called little chaparral willowherb or minute desert willow herb]

narrowleaf willowherb

Tall autumn willowherb (Epilobium brachycarpum) blooms next to a six-foot-tall fence in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice.

Broomrape Family

Purple owl's clover (Castilleja exserta) in Bear Valley. Photo by queerbychoice. (See the Paintbrushes page for more information about some of these species.)

valley tassels (also called narrowleaf owl's clover)

purple owl's clover

cutleaf Indian paintbrush (also called foothill owl's clover)

valley tassels (also called sagebrush Indian paintbrush or thinlobe owl's clover)

hairy bird's beak

slender bird's beak

butter 'n' eggs (also called johnnytuck)

dwarf owl's clover

Butter 'n' eggs (Triphysaria eriantha) on Table Mountain. Photo by queerbychoice.

Plantain Family

Purple Chinese pagodas (Collinsia heterophylla) in a garden in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice. Brewer's sailflower snapdragon

white blue-eyed Mary (also called white collinsia)

purple Chinese pagodas

spinster's blue-eyed Mary

sticky Chinese houses (also called tincture plant)

Phlox Family

Globe gilyflower (Gilia capitata) and mountain garland in a garden in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice. dense false gilyflower

variable leaf collomia

California gilyflower

globe gilyflower (also called globe gilyflower)

bird's eye gilyflower

false babystars

true babystars

thread linanthus

narrowflower flaxflower

evening snow

slender phlox

threadstem pincushionplant

downy pincushionplant (also called purple pincushionplant)

sticky pincushionplant

Bird's eye gilyflower (Gilia tricolor) and California goldfields in a garden in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice.

Knotweed Family

(See the Buckwheats page for more information about some of these species.)

pink spineflower

starlet spineflower

wand buckwheat

California knotweed

woodland fairy mist

 

Other Families

Red maids (Calandrinia ciliata) bloom among river rocks at Parks Bar. Photo by queerbychoice. (See the Monkeyflowers page for more information about some of these species.)

red maids

charming centaury (also called canchalagua or beautiful centaury)

Contura Creek sandmat (also called Contura Creek spurge)

thymeleaf sandmat (also called thymeleaf spurge)

Oregon timwort

little serpentine springbeauty

miner's lettuce

doveweed

chaparral dodder (also called California dodder)

canyon dodder

American wild carrot

foothill tufted poppy

warty spurge

Carolina geranium

Sierra largeflower bluecup

common bluecup (also called Venus' looking glass)

California dwarf flax

common dwarf flax (also called smallflower Western flax or threadstem flax)

yellow and white monkeyflower

Kellogg's monkeyflower

broadtooth monkeyflower

Torrey's monkeyflower

California sandwort

Douglas' stitchwort (also called Douglas' sandwort)

Ahart's nailwort

foothill dotseed plantain

cream cups

longspur seablush

longhorn seablush

slender annual buttercup (also called delicate buttercup)

fringed checkermallow

valley checkermallow

shiny chickweed

The tiny, pale pink flowers of miner's lettuce (Claytonia perfoliata) bloom in a garden in Marysville. This plant is prized as a salad ingredient, generally sold only at high-end grocery stores. Growing your own is much cheaper than buying it from a grocery store! Photo by queerbychoice. Doveweed (Croton setigerus) blooms next to a post in the American River Parkway. Photo by queerbychoice. Foothill tufted poppy (Eschscholzia caespitosa) blooms in gravel on Table Mountain. This plant is closely related to the more familiar California poppy and looks like a miniature version of it (about half as big). Photo by queerbychoice.

Footnotes

1. Las Pilitas Nursery: California Plant Communities by Zip Code
2. California Department of Fish and Game: Wildlife Habitats—California Wildlife Habitat Relationships System
3. California Department of Fish and Game: Wildlife Habitats—California Wildlife Habitat Relationships System
4. CalFlora.org

Nearby LocalWiki regions: Nevada County Woodland Sacramento West Sacramento Chico Winters

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